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One of the most surprising watches to be released this year from BaselWorld has to be Tudor’s Black Bay P01… While the world was provided with teaser shots of an hour index close-up from Tudor leading up to Baselworld, the watch community started to salivate at the prospect of Tudor releasing a Submariner, and the internet was awash with rumours connecting the significance of the year 2019 as an anniversary of note. However the world was simply stunned by what Tudor actually released. The “Black Bay P01” Back in the late 1960’s after having provided watches to the United States Navy, Tudor embarked on “Project Commando” to meet the US Navy’s latest specifications and requirements for their new watches. It was here that a prototype was created that has seen little light of day since as Tudor did not win the contract to supply the US Navy. The design incorporates…

Celebrating 10 years of working with Martin Baker, today at their iconic townhouse event, Bremont announce their Martin Baker MBIII anniversary Limited Edition. Limited to just 310 pieces worldwide, the new MBIII Limited Edition features a titanium barrel and for the first time a white dial with a red warning triangle in the lower half with a reminder: “Danger Ejection Seat”. The case back features a beautiful detailed etching of the Martin Baker MK16 seat from the F35 Lightning. MBIII 10 Anniversary Limited Edition Case back 10 years ago in 2009, Bremont launched the iconic Martin Baker I with a red barrel designed and tested to withstand the tremendous forces that pilots undergo upon ejecting from a modern jet fighter. Exclusively available to prior ejectees, the MBI is easily identified by its red barrel and can only be purchased once you have been verified as having survived a live ejection.…

Today at their annual Townhouse event, Bremont announced their partnership with the Ministry of Defence and in celebration of this, their new Armed Forces Collection. The new HMAF (Her Majesty’s Armed Forces) collection signifies a significant step in the evolution of Bremont’s relationship with Her Majesty’s Government. Until now, although Bremont has been commissioned to produce one off pieces by specific military units uniquely for them, Bremont have not had a formal relationship with the Ministry of Defence. Today that changes. Bremont is proud to announce its partnership with the Ministry of Defence honouring Her Majesty’s Armed Forces. Through this partnership, Bremont has become the sole luxury watch producer allowed to legitimately use the signs, symbols and insignia of all three services. This is also the first time that civilians can purchase official Bremont military timepieces bearing these symbols. To celebrate this new relationship, Bremont today have released three pieces…

To mark the celebration of 50 years since the Apollo 11 moon landing, Omega have announced that they have put the infamous Calibre 321 movement back into production! Over the last 2 years and operating in total secrecy under the codename Alaska II Omega have set up a dedicated Calibre 321 facility in Bienne. Eugene Cernan’s watch – an ST 105.003 which incidentally is the reference model that NASA tested to to become flight certified, is currently in the Omega Museum in Bienne. This was digitally scanned using to create the reference model for re-creating the reborn Calibre 321. The new facility in Bienne will see end to end production of Calibre 321 watches by the same watchmaker including the movement, watch head and bracelet. The Calibre 321 – Omega’s column wheel chronograph movement was last seen in the original Speedmaster before it was replaced by the calibre 861 (a…

When it comes to chronographs, the movement is king, but did you know that there are a number of different ways of making a chronograph movement? Manufacturers will typically charge a hefty premium for a ‘high end’ chronograph so why is this and what differentiates one movement from another? Firstly, There are two types of chronograph – modular & integrated… A modular chronograph comprises two elements. The base movement and the chronograph module itself. An example of a modular chronograph is the ETA 2894, which comprises the 2892 base movement that can be used on its own, delivers basic timekeeping in a compact movement just 3.6mm in height. It contains all the ‘usual suspects’ (hacking, hand winding, hours, mins, seconds etc) for basic timekeeping, and also provides a drive that can deliver power from the mainspring to drive the additional module. In this case, ETA’s modular chronograph module sits on…

In the inimitable words of Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale, “ … there are dinner jackets and there are dinner jackets….. this is the latter….” she was of course referring to the truth that not all things are created equal! The traditional and somewhat humble NATO strap was purely utilitarian by creation – there to ensure that the watch head wasn’t lost in the event of a spring bar failure. However nowadays, few of us undertake frequent activities that are likely to cause this (as well as the quality of spring-bars improving over the years) so nowadays most of us are buying and wearing NATO straps as watch accessories to complement both the watch itself and our attire. Indeed watch manufacturers have themselves caught on to this with Omega having launched a NATO configurator on its website allowing you to see what various straps will look like on a variety…

They say that there are in fact only two kinds of watch enthusiasts, those who have discovered the Seiko SKX, and those who are yet to discover the SKX! The Seiko SKX is one of the worlds most ubiquitous watches. Universally loved by so many around the world, it manages to achieve the seemingly impossible. Let me explain the problem… As a divers watch it is inherently robust, yet the case of the SKX has curved sides ensuring the watch is extremely comfortable when you flex your wrist. The lug to lug dimensions are modest at 46mm meaning it can be comfortably worn by wrists of all sizes (for comparison the 38mm NOMOS Club campus has a considerably larger lug to lug distance of 48.5mm). The crown is offset to the 4oclock position ensuring it doesn’t dig into the back of your hand. The dial is extremely legible and includes both…

For the first time ever, Seiko have released two limited edition watches specifically for the European market. These are the Seiko Prospex “Dawn Grey” Turtle SRPD01K1 and Seiko Prospex “Dawn Grey” Samurai SRPD03K1. Each watch is Limited to just 2018 pieces each and available exclusively in Europe. The Dawn Grey theme pairs a silver/grey dial, bezel and chapter ring with a highlight burst of orange marking the initial dive time on the bezel, orange tip seconds hand, and subtle orange markers at the 3,6,9,12 on the chapter ring. I visited the only UK Seiko boutique to take a look. The Dawn Grey Turtle (SRPD01K1) is priced at £470 and comes with both a steel bracelet with divers extension as well as a Grey colour matched silicone strap in a Limited Edition box. The dial is a beautiful metallic silver/grey dial with the dive time marking running round to the 20…

The German Flieger or Pilots watch in the form it exists today is more a modern interpretation of traditional pilots watches produced and worn during world war II where these watches were strapped to the outside of flight suits.  Although the flieger watches available today are much smaller than the 55mm watches produced during wartime, they carry many of the same features and specifications, drawing their identity from their heritage in producing clean, functional and reliable watches. While many brands might be accused of producing year after year the same watch, Stowa have continued to evolve and innovate their take on the traditional pilots watch and have more recently introduced a more contemporary model called the Ikarus. So we reached out to Stowa who were kind enough to send us one to spend some time with. A little history of Stowa… In 1927, Walter Storz founded Stowa in Hornberg, Black forest,…

This evening at an invitation only event at the Design Museum in Kensington, Bremont launched a new limited edition timepiece – The Supersonic. The launch of the Supersonic celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Concorde, and 100 years of British Airways. This is the eighth historical limited edition timepiece from Bremont and incorporates a ring of aluminium from Alpha Bravo – Heathrow’s last remaining Concorde in its construction. [su_youtube_advanced url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WZI0dyvGf0″ showinfo=”no” rel=”no” modestbranding=”yes”] The Supersonic contains Bremont’s first ever manual wind movement which features an 8 day power reserve with an indicator on the dial at the 12 o’clock position, an exhibition caseback and an elaborately decorated movement featuring the silhouette of Concorde within its construction. The Bremont Supersonic will be available in three flavours. Stainless Steel (limited to 300 pieces) for £9495 Rose Gold (limited to 100 pieces) for £16,995 White Gold (limited to 100 pieces) for £17,995 …

Earlier this year we wrote an article calling out the issues with traditional NATO watch straps – namely that they add unnecessary bulk to a watch as well as lifting it further away from your wrist. We were quite surprised by quantity of positive feedback on the article. It seems that we were not alone in our views and one UK Company ‘Haveston’ have continued to innovate, evolving the design and implementation of the humble NATO strap without losing its two principal benefits – the ease of which you can change a strap and the added security ensuring you don’t lose your watch if a spring bar fails. We contacted Haveston to take a look at their A2-Single pass layout straps, and Alex kindly sent us a selection. The design of the A2-single pass layout straps has evolved the humble NATO into a truly modern strap. Firstly, the lack of…

We are proud to announce that from today our Wristworthy online magazine is now available on Flipboard. Since starting Wristworthy, we have wanted to deliver a unique perspective and journalistic narrative on watches to the broadest possible audience. As part of our strategy to deliver quality watch content, we feel its important not only to build relationships with brands and readers alike, but to also ensure our content is delivered on the best platforms and in the most accessible and appropriate way. For the last two months we have been working with Flipboard to satisfy their criteria as a professional publisher. Before being approved, Flipboard’s editorial team take time to personally qualify each and every publisher to assure the content and prioritise quality over quantity. Only once approved can publishers deliver their content directly through Flipboard to their community of more than 100 million monthly active users. This achievement has…

So you’ve gone out and bought yourself a new watch and after having looked at the water resistance rating declared by the manufacturer you’re confident that it will stand up to the daily lifestyle that you’re accustomed to. However after having worn it in relatively light situations, you’ve now noticed that the watch is showing signs of water inside the case. Surely this cant be right?! Well, depending on the rating you could be in for a nasty surprise. There are in fact two international standards for the water resistance of watches. These are ISO 22810:2010 and ISO 6425. ISO 22810:2010 (which as the designation implies was revised in 2010) defines the standard by which watches are tested and denotes the applied markings allowed to be placed on the watch. The table below is an extract of ratings and their suitability for proximity or use in water (also available at…

In the world of watchmaking a brands’ quality & heritage is usually measured by how many centuries it has been in existence. Brands most often considered ‘high-horology’ such as Vacheron Constantin and Breguet have heritage stretching back to the 1700’s with over two century’s of history and the majority of swiss watch brands you recognise today including Omega, Heuer, Zenith, IWC, AP & Breitling were all founded in the 1800’s. And in the eyes of many, heritage equals quality after all we learn from experience right? The thought that through time a brand or product matures and improves leads to the thought that older companies produce better products. But is that a fair assumption that older is better and newer lacks the experience, finesse and charm? Founded in 1990 and located in Glashütte, there is no doubt that NOMOS is a newcomer to the watch industry. Glashütte is a small…

On Wednesday this week, HODINKEE launched a limited edition Omega Speedmaster celebrating a decade of HODINKEE called the ‘H10’. While it is unsurprising that Omega would take the opportunity to produce a Limited Edition watch, the timing of the release marks the second “Limited Edition Speedmaster” Omega have released in less than 2 months (the Speedmaster Ultraman was released on the 10th of July). Omega have often fallen foul of criticism relating to the number of ‘Limited Edition’ watches they produce and releases like this further contribute to that criticism. However,with a production run of only 500 pieces, this marks one of the few releases from Omega that are not produced in the thousands despite being a Limited Edition – the Seamaster ’40 Years of James Bond’ was limited to 10,007 pieces! The watch itself takes its proportions from the ‘2998’ at 39.7 mm with no crown guards. The bezel…

Almost all watches we see today are rooted in one of the five main watch types that have evolved throughout the course of the 20th Century. Today we will take a brief look at what personifies each of these historic and iconic watch types, what makes them different and the natural setting and purpose of each. Although I’ve been collecting watches for decades I often wish that i had understood this fundamental perspective before I got very lost in the world of watches. There is little direct science in creating the boundaries between watch types and i’m sure you will find examples of watches that bridge more than one type however these are broad guidelines that can be helpful in understanding appropriate styles and help refine your decision as to what might suit you well. The Dress Watch The Dress watch is the most formal of watches. At its core…

The Hamilton khaki field mechanical (reference: H69429901) is a great example of simple, well executed design, implemented at an accessible price point. The  aesthetics deliver an everyday watch with classic proportions coupled with a seemingly unbeatable value proposition including sapphire glass, drilled lugs and a Swiss movement all for £375. Indeed there’s no shortage of blogs, articles and magazines singing its praises and recommending it as unbeatable at this price. However, although the Hamilton Khaki Field mechanical represents fantastic value for money, is there a higher value proposition with its bigger brother? We take a look at the Khaki Field Auto 38mm (reference: H70455533). Firstly lets start with the visual appeal. We found the slightly dressier aesthetics of the auto made for an extremely versatile watch. The watch had an uncanny ability to be suitable with almost any attire. The stepped dial adds a level of texture and detail without…

Over the last decade, more and more watch companies are supplying rubber watch straps and with good reason. Once chunky rubber straps were the staple necessity for a divers watch, however as technology, manufacturing processes and design and all have improved, rubber is no longer the cheap offering but a practical and luxurious alternative. With the hot weather upon us, a good rubber strap can be a life saver. Unlike canvas and leather straps, rubber straps are far more resilient to wear and tear. There is an inherent amount of give in a rubber that helps maintain its comfort as your wrist expands in the heat and in addition, it’s not made of a porous material, it doesn’t absorb sweat or other liquids. What follows is in our view the most comprehensive look at rubber straps we think anyone has ever done. We have covered a plethora of price points…

Over the years I have had many interesting conversations with people who extoll the virtues of NATO straps, however its amazing how many people simple regurgitate what they have been told. While its true that by the inherent design of a NATO strap it secures the watch by passing a single piece of material through both spring bars, the additional piece of material behind it is simply not necessary and serves no useful purpose on a modern watch. The idea of a NATO is that in the event of a single spring bar failure, the whole watch doesn’t fall of your wrist but the strap remains attached to your arm, and the watch head will still be there attached by the remaining single spring bar – and while this is not ideal, it means you haven’t damaged your watch by if falling off your wrist or worse still lost it…

Chances are if you were looking to buy a chronograph, you would probably choose one of three chronographs. These three watches are the most iconic, most famous and easily recognised chronographs in the world. That’s not to say that there aren’t other hugely iconic or famous chronographs, but put simply they are not in this league. Let me introduce you to the “Chrono-trinity”. The Rolex Daytona, the Breitling Navitimer, and the Omega Speedmaster. Each with its own unique heritage, these are the worlds most desirable chronographs. In October last year the watch world went slightly crazy as Paul Newman’s own Rolex Cosmograph Daytona ‘Paul Newman’ came up for auction with Philips and sold for a record breaking $17.75m. Making this watch arguably the most desirable watch in the world. The Daytona’s fame was solidified by the romance and ownership of the watch by Paul Newman, who was photographed for an Italian…